photo of a goat

Week 2 Lab Summary: Wool

Introduction INTRO:For our first experiment, our Experimental Archaeology class got to work turning freshly shorn wool into a piece of woven fabric. This experiment was challenging to record quantitatively, but gave us a great glimpse into the lives of women throughout much of history and the immense amount of work required to create fabric and…

Group F: Wool Lab Data

Weaving: The steps we performed: (see corresponding images below) Qualitative observations and quantitative notes about the process: There were lots of new words for me in this part of the lab, so I’m including a section on relevant definitions: Carding: The steps we performed: (see corresponding images below) Qualitative observations and quantitative notes about the…

Group D: Wool Data Recording (Week 2)

SPINNING: The process of spinning wool utilizing a drop spindle technique was taught to us by Alejandra with some assistance as needed throughout the process. The initial materials needed: Step by step illustration: Step 1: Divide your thread in half and have the two halves meet in the middle. Step 2: Tie a knot at…

week 2 lab data group C: WOOL

Group C members: Ann Beimers, Kenton Nagle, Soren Eversoll, Eila Planinc For this lab we were split into three stations: spinning, carding, and weaving. For each station, I attempted to record as much quantitative data as possible, but mostly ended up with qualitative reflections on what I was observing. Spinning What was the learning curve…

Group E Week 2 Data: Wool Working

by Bee Candelaria Spinning Demonstration by Alejandra We couldn’t have merely begun this lab without the expert, Alejandra, to show up how to spin the wool. The skill floor (to take a term from Rahim) for spinning was higher than the other activities. The method we were taught is illustrated in this gallery. Most students…